Considering self-order kiosks? Here’s where to start

While kiosk ordering may have seemed like something of the distant future just a few years ago, today kiosks’ arrival in restaurants across the country seems all but inevitable. McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King have each all announced large investments into kiosk ordering in their stores, and other brands are taking notice. If you are a decision-maker at a quick-service restaurant brand, there is no doubt you have already begun to wonder about whether now is the right time for your brand to test kiosk ordering. This article covers a few insights we’ve gained from talking to executives across the industry as well as in testing out and expanding kiosk programs with our customers. There are three main questions you should consider. How will kiosk implementation affect store-level operations? Who in your organization will be affected by kiosk implementation? Finally, how will you test your kiosk program?

How will kiosk implementation affect store-level operations?

Implementing kiosk ordering is a big change—your employees and customers alike will need to adapt to this change, and so it is imperative that the transition be as seamless as possible. On the backend, opt for kiosk software that will integrate directly with your POS—this way you will only need to update menu information in one place, and orders will be sent to your kitchens just as they are when a cashier enters the order. From the perspective of your customers, be sure that the kiosk software you choose has a natural, responsive User Interface. A poor User Experience could cause your customers to feel frustrated and they may resent the presence of kiosks in your stores. It’s important that the experience of using kiosks in your stores not just be sufficient, but delightful. This will help win over customers who might be initially hesitant to this new change.

Who in your organization will be affected by kiosk implementation?

Any change in a large organization, even a small change, is likely to meet some friction. Because implementing kiosk will affect multiple departments in your organization—IT, Operations, Marketing, Franchising—you should gain buy-in from members of these departments sooner rather than later. Your choice of a kiosk solution is important here: it will be difficult to gain the support of those in Marketing, for example, if the kiosk software you hope to pilot poorly represents your brand or lacks data reporting functionality. It might be hard to win over your Director of Operations, on the other hand, if the kiosk implementation would involve a serious shift in your restaurant’s store-level operating model. As you move forward with a kiosk software solution, seek the input of other stakeholders involved so that you can enter the pilot with everyone in alignment.

How will you test your kiosk program?

Once you’ve decided kiosk is something you want to concretely explore, the next step is to run a test. It would be foolish, of course, to roll out a new technology in hundreds of locations across the country before testing it out in a few pilot stores. But while the insight to run a test is hardly revolutionary, designing the test so that you can actually learn what you set out to learn is more difficult than it might seem. As you begin to design your kiosk test, consider the following:

What do you want to achieve with kiosk long term?

Identify ideally just one and at most a few long-term goals for kiosk. Why did you decide to explore kiosk? What do you hope to get out of it?

What can you test in the short-term that will shed light on kiosk benefits in the long-term?

What is the outcome that will make you decide to expand the kiosk software into more stores and what outcome would lead you to pull the plug?

How will you measure this outcome throughout the testing period?

Be sure that the metrics are simple and you limit confounding variables that could cloud your results. In our tests, common metrics used are change in average order volume, change in throughput, and change in labor as a percent of sales—but the specific metrics you choose should correspond to your specific goals in implementing kiosk.

As you consider how to develop your kiosk test, keep in mind the importance of working with a kiosk partner that values customer success and will be willing to work with you to make kiosk a success in your stores.